Overview

Available to Robert Half and Protiviti employees and those in the Salaried Professional Services program (excluding temporary employees in Hawaii) — refer to your benefits guide for the plans available to you.

Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) allow you to pay for eligible health care or dependent care expenses on a pre-tax basis through payroll deductions. You save money because you don’t pay taxes on the money you set aside.

Unlike HSAs that roll over every year, FSAs are considered “use it or lose it” accounts. Contributions won’t roll over to the next plan year. Unused funds are forfeited at the end of the plan year.

FSAs are administered by TRI-AD.

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Important!

The medical plan option you choose determines what health care account — or accounts — you can use:

  • If you enroll in the $400 Deductible or the $900 Deductible Plan (or no plan), you can contribute to a Health Care FSA.
  • If you enroll in the $1,500 Deductible or the $2,500 Deductible Plan, you have several options:
    1. Contribute to a Health Savings Account (HSA) and a Combination Health Care FSA
    2. Contribute to an HSA only
    3. Contribute to a Health Care FSA only

Health Care FSA

The Health Care FSA is for eligible health care expenses such as out-of-pocket medical, dental, vision and prescription drug expenses, such as copays, coinsurance, deductibles, glasses and contact lenses, orthodontia treatment, and Lasik surgery.

Combination Health Care FSA

You can only participate in a Combination Health Care FSA if you’re enrolled in the $1,500 or $2,500 Deductible Plan.

The Combination Health Care FSA allows you to pay for eligible out-of-pocket dental and vision expenses with pre-tax dollars. You can also pay for medical expenses once you meet the IRS deductible limit. The IRS deductible limits are:

  • Individual coverage: $1,400
  • Family coverage: $2,800
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Remember

The Combination FSA is only available to those enrolled in the $1,500 Deductible or $2,500 Deductible Plan and who elect to contribute to a Health Savings Account (HSA).

iconWhy Contribute to Both a Combination FSA and an HSA?

If you participate in the $1,500 Deductible or $2,500 Deductible Plans, you can maximize your tax savings by using a Combination Health Care FSA along with your HSA, especially if you expect significant dental or vision expenses in 2019.

For example, if you plan to have major expenses for things like crowns, dental implants or LASIK surgery, consider using the Combination Health Care FSA first to pay for those expenses.

Dependent Care FSA

The Dependent Care FSA allows you to pay for eligible dependent care expenses, including day care, preschool and after-school care for a dependent child under age 13 or for a tax dependent who is physically or mentally incapable of self-care.

Compare Accounts

Our FSA partner, TRI-AD, administers all three types of FSAs. For more information, refer to the FSA materials in the Resource Center on the Mercer Marketplace 365.

  Dependent Care FSA Health Care FSA Combination Health Care FSA
Who can participate All benefits-eligible employees All benefits-eligible employees HSA participants only (for those enrolled in the $1,500 Deductible Plan or $2,500 Deductible Plan)
How much you can contribute annually*
  • Up to $5,000 for individuals or married couples filing joint tax returns
  • Up to $2,500 if you are married and file separate tax returns
Up to $2,750 Up to $2,750
Eligible expenses Day care, preschool and after-school care for a dependent child under age 13 or for a tax dependent who is physically or mentally incapable of self-care Medical, prescription drug, dental and vision expenses not paid by your insurance — see IRS Publication 502 for a complete list Dental and vision expenses only until you meet the IRS deductible limit of:
  • $1,400 for individual coverage
  • $2,800 for family coverage
Once you meet the IRS deductible limit and submit the appropriate verification form for approval, funds can also be used for medical expenses.
Availability of funds Funds are available as they are withheld from your pay and deposited into your account. The full amount is available to you at the start of the year or the month after you join the plan. The full amount is available to you at the start of the year or the month after you join the plan.
Accessing your account You will receive a Dependent Care Reimbursement Account debit card from TRI-AD, or you can file claims directly for reimbursement. You will receive a Health Care FSA debit card from TRI-AD, or you can file claims directly for reimbursement. For dental and vision expenses, you can use the same TRI-AD debit card that you use for your HSA expenses, or you can file claims directly for reimbursement.
For medical expenses (once eligible), claims must be submitted manually.
  If you enroll in more than one FSA, you’ll receive only one debit card to use for both health care and dependent care expenses.
Substantiation of claims If you receive a request to substantiate a claim, please do so, or your card will be deactivated, and unsubstantiated funds will become taxable.
“Use it or lose it” Any FSA funds not used by December 31 are forfeited, so plan carefully! Go to Mercer Marketplace 365 to use the FSA expense calculator to help you estimate your expenses for the year.
You have until March 31, 2021, to submit claims for reimbursement on any eligible expenses you incur during 2020.
If your employment ends or you terminate the plan as part of a qualified life event change
  • Your FSA coverage ends on the termination date, and your debit card will be deactivated.
  • You have 90 days from the end of the plan year (March 31, 2021) to submit claims for services received within the 2020 plan year up to your termination date.
  • You can’t file claims for services received after your termination date.
  • You forfeit any funds remaining in your account after all qualified claims have been paid.

* Note to highly compensated employees: If you’re a highly compensated employee (as defined by the IRS), it’s possible your FSA contributions may be limited prior to the beginning of the plan year or suspended during the plan year depending on the outcome of certain nondiscrimination tests imposed on FSAs by the IRS. If a limitation or suspension becomes necessary, you’ll be notified in writing before it happens.